• Open Access

Atoms in a Radio-Frequency-Dressed Optical Lattice

N. Lundblad, P. J. Lee, I. B. Spielman, B. L. Brown, W. D. Phillips, and J. V. Porto
Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 150401 – Published 14 April 2008

Abstract

We load cold atoms into an optical lattice dramatically reshaped by radio-frequency coupling of state-dependent lattice potentials. This radio-frequency dressing changes the unit cell of the lattice at a subwavelength scale, such that its curvature and topology departs strongly from that of a simple sinusoidal lattice potential. Radio-frequency dressing has previously been performed at length scales from mm to tens of μm, but not at the single-optical-wavelength scale. At this length scale significant coupling between adiabatic potentials leads to nonadiabatic transitions, which we measure as a function of lattice depth and dressing amplitude. We also investigate the dressing by measuring changes in the momentum distribution of the dressed states.

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  • Received 14 December 2007

DOI:https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.150401

This article is available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the published article’s title, journal citation, and DOI.

Authors & Affiliations

N. Lundblad*, P. J. Lee, I. B. Spielman, B. L. Brown, W. D. Phillips, and J. V. Porto

  • Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899, USA

  • *nathan.lundblad@nist.gov

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Issue

Vol. 100, Iss. 15 — 18 April 2008

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