Integration of classical and quantum physics

Phys. Rev. A 40, 6781 – Published 15 December 1989
Laszlo Tisza

Abstract

The perennial aspect of the Newtonian foundation of mathematical physics is that the concept of ‘‘motion,’’ that is, ‘‘kinematics,’’ is to serve as the interface between mathematics and physics. Kinematics subdivides into the theory of orbital translation and that of undulation and spinning. Newtonian mechanics is based on giving to translational kinematics a priority over the other modes, since planetary revolution can be represented as translation modified by gravitation. The so-called breakdown of classical physics stems from giving the translational priority a canonical status and extending it to the constituents of matter. We claim that in this case the priority is to be reversed. The main content of this paper is to establish the algebraic model for an indivisible, undulating entity that we call a ‘‘wave simplex.’’ It is used as the point of departure for a non-Newtonian quantum dynamics in which physical and algebraic concepts are in close correspondence. The postulates of the classical phenomenological theories and those of the canonical theories based on translational priority are established as theorems under the proper limiting conditions, and forces are constructed rather than postulated. While the formal structure of two-level quantum mechanics is established as well, exception is taken to treating spin as a property of a point particle. It is considered self-evident that a spinning object is orientable, a property accounted for in terms of a unitary triplet. This is the point of departure for an intrinsic particle dynamics. A main result is the integration of classical and quantum physics, thus closing the gap created by the heuristic method of canonical quantization.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.40.6781

  • Received 10 August 1989
  • Published in the issue dated December 1989

© 1989 The American Physical Society

Authors & Affiliations

Laszlo Tisza

  • Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

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